About

Sound research for a more sustainable, equitable, democratic, and prosperous Appalachia.

What We Do 

The Ohio River Valley Institute is an independent, nonprofit research and communications center—a think tank—founded in 2020. We equip the region’s residents and decision-makers with the policy research and practical tools they need to advance long-term solutions to some of Appalachia’s most significant challenges. Our work includes in-depth research, commentary, and analysis, delivered online, by email, and in-person to policy champions, emerging leaders, and a range of community partners.

What We Stand For

The Ohio River Valley Institute’s mission is to support communities in the region working to advance a more prosperous, sustainable, and equitable Appalachia. The Institute produces data-driven research and proposes policies to improve the economic performance and standards of living for the greater Ohio River Valley,  with a focus on shared prosperity, clean energy, and equitable democracy.

Our Vision

The Ohio River Valley is a place where communities can thrive by investing in, rather than exploiting, local resources. By moving beyond an extractive economy toward shared prosperity, lasting job growth, clean energy, and civic engagement, the region can cultivate a stronger and more equitable economy that will set an example for similar regions throughout the world. 

Our Commitment to Equity, Inclusion, and Justice

As an independent research center, we have an obligation to ensure that our work accurately incorporates learnings from, and contemplates the potential impact on, people with a broad range of backgrounds and experiences in the region. We recognize that where equity is absent, there are no strong communities, thriving economies, or healthy environments. 

Our Team

Staff

Joanne Kilgour

Joanne Kilgour

Executive Director

Joanne Kilgour, Esq. is an environmental lawyer and nonprofit professional with a passion for justice and democracy. Informed by her work with the Center for Coalfield Justice and the Sierra Club Pennsylvania Chapter, Joanne is committed to securing social, economic, and environmental policies that support communities while demanding long-term structural change.

Joanne Kilgour, Esq. is a Pennsylvania-based environmental lawyer and nonprofit professional with a passion for justice and democracy. Joanne most recently served as the Director of the Sierra Club Pennsylvania Chapter, where she stewarded the organization’s statewide operations and managed its lobbying and political program. Before joining the Sierra Club, Joanne had the opportunity to combine her legal background and passion for community-based advocacy into a position as the first Legal Director at the Center for Coalfield Justice (CCJ). At CCJ, she worked to infuse legal tools into grassroots organizing efforts, helping to support community members in the coalfields of southwestern Pennsylvania on matters related to underground mining, oil and gas development, and environmental justice.

Joanne received her undergraduate education at Carnegie Mellon University, where she served as a Fellow in Local Democracy through a partnership with the Coro Center for Civic Leadership and the Southwestern Pennsylvania Program for Deliberative Democracy. Earning her law degree from the University of Pittsburgh School of Law, Joanne was awarded a Certificate in Environmental, Law, Science, and Policy and worked in the school’s Environmental Law Clinic, where she learned client-centered counseling methods and provided legal services to clients who otherwise could not afford representation. During law school, Joanne also received the Thornburgh Prize for Legal Service to recognize her public interest work with communities in the coal and gas fields.

In addition, Joanne serves on the Board of Directors for Conservation Voters of Pennsylvania and as member of the Conservation and Natural Resources Advisory Council for the Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources.

Joanne is motivated by a commitment to secure social, economic, and environmental policies that support communities while demanding long-term structural change.

Ted Boettner

Ted Boettner

Senior Researcher

Ted focuses on pathways that bring sustainable economic development and shared prosperity to the region through research and analysis and has over 15 years of public policy experience. Prior to joining OVRI, Ted was the founding executive director of the WV Center on Budget and Policy.

Ted focuses on pathways that bring sustainable economic development and shared prosperity to the region through research and analysis. Prior to joining ORVI, Ted was co-founding executive director of the West Virginia Center on Budget and Policy where he authored dozens of publications on economic and energy issues and worked closely with policymakers and stakeholders to raise wages and benefits for thousands of people while also protecting important public goods, such as schools. Ted also helped launch the Multi-State Shale Research Collaborative, was primary member to the U.S. Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative, an advisory committee within the U.S. Department of Interior, and was named “one of the most influential business leaders” in West Virginia by The State Journal (WV). His work has been frequently cited in the West Virginia media, as well as the Washington Post, New York Times, Wall Street Journal, and other publications. Ted has taught political science and public policy at West Virginia University, where he received his undergraduate degree, and has served on the boards of various community organizations and nonprofits. He currently serves on the board of the Charleston Urban Renewal Authority and Legal Aid of West Virginia.  Ted received his master’s degree in political science from the University of New Hampshire and lives with his partner and two kids in Charleston, West Virginia. When he’s not being a policy wonk, Ted enjoys a nice whitewater paddle in West Virginia, running marathons, hiking at Dolly Sods, some political theory, and cooking for friends.

Sean O’Leary

Sean O’Leary

Senior Researcher

Sean O’Leary, senior researcher, energy and petrochemicals, is a native of Wheeling, WV. He has written about coal, natural gas, and their role in the economies of Appalachia in a book, a newspaper column, and blog titled, “The State of My State”. Previously, Sean served as communications director at the NW Energy Coalition in Seattle, Washington.

Sean O’Leary, senior researcher, energy and petrochemicals, has studied and written about coal, natural gas, and their role in the economies of Appalachia since the beginning of the fracking boom. He is the author of “The State of My State” blog and newspaper column, which ran in the Martinsburg (WV) Journal between 2010 and 2014. Since 2016, Sean has served as communications director of the NW Energy Coalition in Seattle, Washington where he has helped develop and promote policies advancing the Northwest’s transition to an emissions-free electric system, just transitions for fossil fuel workers and communities, and the restoration of salmon and orca whales whose survival is threatened by hydropower dams on the lower Snake River.

Previously, Sean was the founder and president of MarketLab, Inc., a market modeling and promotional services firm that provided analytic and creative services to over 50 national consumer packaged goods brands. He also created the ZeroBase marketing optimization model, which was used by brands to analyze performance and optimally allocate promotional spending.

In his spare time, Sean is an accomplished playwright and author of six plays that have been professionally produced. They include “Pound”, about the poet Ezra Pound, which starred Christopher Lloyd in an off-Broadway production in 2018. Sean’s plays have been recognized by the National Endowment for The Arts, the National Arts Club, and the West Virginia Department of Arts and Culture. In 2005, he was named to the Literary Map of West Virginia.

Sean is a native of Wheeling, West Virginia and is a graduate of Warwood High School and Bethany College. He and his wife, Kat Elias, live in Indianola, Washington. Sean’s book, “The State of My State”, published in 2013, is available in bookstores and on Amazon. You can also visit “The State of My State” blog.

Eric de Place

Eric de Place

Research Fellow

During nearly two decades at Sightline Institute in the Pacific Northwest, Eric earned a reputation as an authority on climate, energy, and economic issues. He has published more than a thousand pieces of popular writing and technical analysis on sustainability issues and his work has been featured in hundreds of news media stories.

During nearly two decades at Sightline Institute, Eric earned a reputation as an authority on a range of issues, as well as an effective advocate who shapes public policy at the state and local level. His successes include research-based efforts to roll back oil industry tax loopholes, halt dirty energy projects, defeat right-wing property rights initiatives, expose shady PR firms, advance regional climate policy, and much more. He has published more than a thousand

pieces of popular writing and technical analysis on sustainability issues and his work has been featured in hundreds of news media stories, including at Time magazine, the New York Times, Washington Post, Fox News, CNN, Vox, NPR, the Guardian and scores of other outlets. Eric still works with Sightline Institute, where he directs the Thin Green Line team devoted to shedding light on coal, oil, and gas development in the Pacific Northwest.

Eric also runs an independent consulting practice, Salish Strategies, founded on the belief that well-crafted research can capture the imagination to drive change. He also serves on the Board of Directors of Spark Northwest and he partners with Pyramid Communications, serving as a senior strategist of counsel.

Keiko Budech

Keiko Budech

Communications Manager

Keiko, communications manager, works on strategic messaging and digital communications to amplify the Institute’s research and build long-term community solutions in the Ohio Valley region.

Keiko has worked in communications and strategic messaging for over six years, focusing her time on climate and urbanism issues. She is passionate about translating wonky policy into digestible and accessible language. Keiko works at the intersection of sustainability, place, and people to build healthy communities where everyone has the opportunity to thrive. Keiko still works at Transportation Choices Coalition, where she manages the communications program. Keiko also currently serves as an officer on the Seattle Transit Advisory Board. She previously worked at Sightline Institute, a Pacific Northwest public policy think tank, and served on the Seattle Planning Commission.

Advisory Council

Martina Angela Caretta

Martina Angela Caretta

Dr Martina Angela Caretta is a Senior Lecturer at the Department of Human Geography at Lund University, Sweden. She holds a PhD in Geography from Stockholm University, Sweden. She holds a PhD in Geography from Stockholm University, Sweden. Dr Caretta was an Assistant Professor in Geography at West Virginia University between 2016 and 2020.

Dr Martina Angela Caretta is a Senior Lecturer at the Department of Human Geography at Lund University, Sweden. She holds a PhD in Geography from Stockholm University, Sweden. Dr Caretta was an Assistant Professor in Geography at West Virginia University between 2016 and 2020. While at WVU, Dr Caretta investigated the social, economic and environmental impacts of hydraulic fracturing and pipelines development in Appalachia. Her research agenda revolves around the human dimensions of water and climate change adaptation. Dr Caretta is a Coordinating Lead Author of the United National Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 6th Assessment Report.

Tony Ingraffea

Tony Ingraffea

Dr. Ingraffea is a Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Emeritus, and a Weiss Presidential Teaching Fellow at Cornell University where he has been since 1977. He holds a B.S. in Aerospace Engineering from the University of Notre Dame, an M.S. in Civil Engineering from Polytechnic Institute of New York, and a Ph.D. in Civil Engineering from the University of Colorado. Dr. Ingraffea’s research concentrates on computer simulation and physical testing of complex fracturing processes. He has authored with his students and research associates over 250 papers in these areas.
Dr. Ingraffea is a Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Emeritus, and a Weiss Presidential Teaching Fellow at Cornell University where he has been since 1977. He holds a B.S. in Aerospace Engineering from the University of Notre Dame, an M.S. in Civil Engineering from Polytechnic Institute of New York, and a Ph.D. in Civil Engineering from the University of Colorado. Dr. Ingraffea’s research concentrates on computer simulation and physical testing of complex fracturing processes. He has authored with his students and research associates over 250 papers in these areas. Since 1977, he has been a principal or co-principal investigator on over $37M in R&D projects from the NSF, EXXON, Shell, Amoco, NASA Langley, Nichols Research, NASA Glenn, AFOSR, FAA, Kodak, U. S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station, U.S. Dept. of Transportation, IBM, Schlumberger, Gas Technology Institute, Sandia National Laboratories, the Association of Iron and Steel Engineers, General Dynamics, Boeing, Caterpillar Tractor, DARPA, and Northrop Grumman. Professor Ingraffea was a member of the first group of Presidential Young Investigators named by the National Science Foundation in 1984. For his research achievements in hydraulic fracturing he won the International Association for Computer Methods and Advances in Geomechanics “1994 Significant Paper Award”, and he twice won the National Research Council/U.S. National Committee for Rock Mechanics Award for Research in Rock Mechanics (1978, 1991). He was named the Dwight C. Baum Professor of Engineering at Cornell in 1992. He became a Fellow in 1991 and a Distinguished Member in 2019 of the American Society of Civil Engineers. He became Co-Editor-in-Chief of Engineering Fracture Mechanics in 2005. In 2006, he won ASTM’s George Irwin Medal for outstanding research in fracture mechanics, and in 2009 was named a Fellow of the International Congress on Fracture. TIME Magazine named him one of its “People Who Mattered” in 2011, and he became the first president of Physicians, Scientists, and Engineers for Healthy Energy, Inc. (www.psehealthyenergy.org) in that same year. He is a co-author of papers on methane emissions (2011, 2012, 2014, 2016), wellbore integrity in Pennsylvania (2014, 2019), and on conversion of New York (2012) and California (2014) to wind/sun/water power for all energy uses in the next few decades.
Jill Kriesky

Jill Kriesky

Dr. Kriesky (retired) was the Associate Director of the Southwest Pennsylvania Environmental Health Project and Senior Project Coordinator at the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health’s Center for Healthy Environments and Communities. She has spent more than twenty years in university-based community outreach on issues including labor relations, economic development and community health issues. 
Dr. Kriesky (retired) was the Associate Director of the Southwest Pennsylvania Environmental Health Project and Senior Project Coordinator at the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health’s Center for Healthy Environments and Communities. She has spent more than twenty years in university-based community outreach on issues including labor relations, economic development and community health issues.  As the director of West Virginia Campus Compact, the West Virginia University Office of Service Learning Programs, and Wheeling Jesuit University’s Service for Social Action Center and Clifford M. Lewis, SJ, Appalachian Institute, Kriesky developed and managed a series of community/academic partnerships with community-based organizations in West Virginia. Kriesky received her MS in Economics from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and her PhD in Economics from the University of New Hampshire.
Leslie Marshall

Leslie Marshall

Dr. Leslie Marshall serves as the Associate Director of the Center for Sustainable Business in the Katz Graduate School of Business and College of Business Administration at the University of Pittsburgh, overseeing all aspects of the center’s programming. Her research focuses on how socio-economic class, ethnicity, and gender intersect to influence cooperation in groups and the implications for policymaking. Most recently, she served as Co-Principal Investigator, Project Manager, and Lead Author for the Marshall Plan for Middle America (MP4MA) Roadmap, a non-partisan, multi-sectoral research effort to envision a more equitable and sustainable regional economic future for the Ohio River Valley and Upper Appalachia.
Dr. Leslie Marshall serves as the Associate Director of the Center for Sustainable Business in the Katz Graduate School of Business and College of Business Administration at the University of Pittsburgh, overseeing all aspects of the center’s programming. Her research focuses on how socio-economic class, ethnicity, and gender intersect to influence cooperation in groups and the implications for policymaking. Most recently, she served as Co-Principal Investigator, Project Manager, and Lead Author for the Marshall Plan for Middle America (MP4MA) Roadmap, a non-partisan, multi-sectoral research effort to envision a more equitable and sustainable regional economic future for the Ohio River Valley and Upper Appalachia. Her academic work has been published in top academic journals, including the Journal of Experimental Political Science, The Journal of Politics, and the Quarterly Journal of Political Science. She has extensive field experience coordinating large-scale data collection efforts in Lebanon, Uganda, and the United States. As an independent consultant, she has worked with the United Nations Development Programme and Innovations for Poverty Action. She is an affiliate of the Economic and Social Rights Research Group of the University of Connecticut’s Human Rights Institute and previously collaborated with the Centre for Women in Governance (Uganda) and with the Lebanese Center for Policy Studies. She also co-owns a small consulting firm, the Research Group for Sustainable Impacts, based in Pittsburgh, PA and Munich, Germany, that assists organizations in developing more inclusive and sustainable practices for measuring and evaluating the impact of their programs. She holds a Ph.D. and an M.A. in Political Science from the University of Pittsburgh and a B.A. in Philosophy, Politics, and Economics from Denison University.
Lou Martin

Lou Martin

Lou Martin is an associate professor of history at Chatham University in Pittsburgh, a board member of the West Virginia Mine Wars Museum, and an honorary member of UMWA Local 1440. His research focuses on rural-industrial workers in Appalachia. He has published articles in LABOR: Working-Class Histories of the AmericasLabor HistoryPennsylvania HistoryWest Virginia History, and Jacobin.
Lou Martin is an associate professor of history at Chatham University in Pittsburgh, a board member of the West Virginia Mine Wars Museum, and an honorary member of UMWA Local 1440. His research focuses on rural-industrial workers in Appalachia. He has published articles in LABOR: Working-Class Histories of the AmericasLabor HistoryPennsylvania HistoryWest Virginia History, and Jacobin.  His 2015 book Smokestacks in the Hills: Rural-Industrial Workers in West Virginia examined the culture and politics of steel and pottery workers in his home state’s northern panhandle during the 20th century.  Martin received honorable mention from the Organization of American Historians–David Montgomery Book Award Committee. He earned his PhD in history from West Virginia University, was awarded the Buhl Professorship at Chatham University in 2016, and was awarded the WVU History Department’s Outstanding Alumni Award in 2018. Currently, he is writing a brief history of social movements in Appalachia for WVU Press.
Matt Mehalik

Matt Mehalik

Matt is Executive Director of the Breathe Project, a coalition of local residents, environmental advocates, public health professionals and academics advocating for healthier air for the Pittsburgh region. From 2007 – 2016, he served as Program Director for Sustainable Pittsburgh where he created Champions for Sustainability. Matt teaches environmental policy and community resiliency courses at Heinz College, Carnegie Mellon University.

Matt serves as Executive Director of the Breathe Project, a coalition of local residents, environmental advocates, public health professionals and academics advocating for healthier air for the Pittsburgh region.  From 2007 – 2016, he served as Program Director, Sustainable Pittsburgh, where he created, Champions for Sustainability.  Matt teaches environmental policy and community resiliency courses at Heinz College, Carnegie Mellon University since 2008.  He has written multiple peer-reviewed publications in sustainability, design, and education and has co-authored Ethical and Environmental Challenges to Engineering with Michael E. Gorman and Patricia Werhane.  Matt’s Ph.D. is in Systems Engineering from the University of Virginia.  He serves on the boards of Phipps Conservatory, and Pine Richland School District.
Nick Muller

Nick Muller

Dr. Muller is the Lester and Judith Lave Associate Professor of Economics, Engineering, and Public Policy in the Department of Engineering and Public Policy and the Tepper School of Business at Carnegie Mellon University. Previously, he was on the faculty at Middlebury College. Dr. Muller is also a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. He teaches microeconomics, benefit-cost analysis, environmental and natural resource economics, and energy policy.
In July, 2017 Nick Muller joined the Department of Engineering and Public Policy and the Tepper School of Business at Carnegie Mellon University as the Lester and Judith Lave Associate Professor of Economics, Engineering, and Public Policy. Prior to Carnegie Mellon, he was on the faculty at Middlebury College since the fall of 2007. Nick  joined the National Bureau of Economic Research as a Faculty research Fellow in 2012 and was promoted to Research Associate in the fall of 2013.  He teaches microeconomics, benefit-cost analysis, environmental and natural resource economics, and energy policy. Broadly, his research focuses on measuring air pollution damage and market-based policy design. Nick’s current work focuses on: renewable energy systems, estimating air pollution and greenhouse gas damage from economic activity in 2017, air pollution policy and municipal finance systems, and inequality in both market and augmented measures of income. Nick has published papers in the American Economic Review (3), Science (2), Proceedings of the National Academies of Science (2), Nature Sustainability, Nature Climate Change, Explorations in Economic History, Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, Journal of Environmental Economics and ManagementEnvironmental and Resource Economics, Resource and Energy Economics, The Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, The Energy Journal, Environment and Development Economics, Environmental Science & TechnologyThe Berkeley Electronic Press’ Journal of Economic Analysis and Policy (2), Water Resources Research, Environment International, and Environmetrics.
Mark Partridge

Mark Partridge

Mark Partridge is the Swank Chair of Rural-Urban Policy at Ohio State University and is affiliated with GSSI in Italy and Jinan University in China. He served twelve years as Co-Editor of the Journal of Regional Science, is Co-editor of Springer Briefs in Regional Science, and serves on a dozen other editorial boards. He has published nearly 150 academic journal papers and 60 other book chapters, briefs, and reports.
Mark Partridge is the Swank Chair of Rural-Urban Policy at Ohio State University and is affiliated with GSSI in Italy and Jinan University in China. He served twelve years as Co-Editor of the Journal of Regional Science, is Co-editor of Springer Briefs in Regional Science, and serves on a dozen other editorial boards. He has published nearly 150 academic journal papers and 60 other book chapters, briefs, and reports. He has published in leading journals such as the American Economic Review, Journal of Economic Geography, Journal of International Economics, Journal of Urban Economics, and Review of Economics and Statistics. He co-authored the book The Geography of American Poverty: Is there a Role for Place-Based Policy? Dr. Partridge frequently gives presentations and addresses to academic and practitioner groups around the world. Professor Partridge has received research funding from many sources including European Commission, U.S. National Science Foundation, and Canadian SSHRC. His research includes investigating poverty, inequality, and regional growth, and he is a leading rural policy expert. He is a Fellow and President of the Regional Science Association International and has received the prestigious NARSC Isard and Boyce Awards. He also served as NARSC Chair and NARSC President. Dr. Partridge is a Fellow and served as President of the Southern Regional Science Association.
Mark Paul

Mark Paul

Mark Paul is an assistant professor of economics and environmental studies at New College of Florida, a fellow at the Roosevelt Institute, and a senior fellow at Data for Progress. He’s a political economist, and spends most of his time thinking about inequality and the climate crisis.
Mark Paul is an assistant professor of economics and environmental studies at New College of Florida, a fellow at the Roosevelt Institute, and a senior fellow at Data for Progress. He’s a political economist, and spends most of his time thinking about inequality and the climate crisis. Currently, Dr. Paul is working on a book project entitled Freedom Is Not Enough: Economic Rights for an Unequal World, under contract with Chicago University Press. His research and writing has appeared in the New York Times, The Economist, Washington Post, The Financial Times, The Atlantic, Vox, The American Prospect, The Nation, The Hill, CNN, and Jacobin, among other publications.
John Russo

John Russo

John Russo is a visiting scholar at Georgetown’s Kalmanovitz Initiative for Labor and the Working Poor. He is professor emeritus at Youngstown State University where he served as the Coordinator of the Labor Studies Program in the Warren P. Williamson College of Business Administration and co-director of the Center for Working-Class Studies. He has written widely on labor, class, and community issues.
John Russo is a visiting scholar at Georgetown’s Kalmanovitz Initiative for Labor and the Working Poor. He is professor emeritus at Youngstown State University where he served as the Coordinator of the Labor Studies Program in the Warren P. Williamson College of Business Administration and co-director of the Center for Working-Class Studies. He has written widely on labor, class, and community issues.  At YSU, John was one of just two professors ever to have won distinguished professor awards in all four categories: scholarship, teaching, university service, and community service. He also served on the Board of Directors of the Mahoning Valley Organizing Collaborative and was a recipient of the Working-Class Studies Association Lifetime Achievement Award.
Heather M. Stephens

Heather M. Stephens

Heather M. Stephens is an Associate Professor in Resource Economics and Management and a Faculty Research Affiliate at the Regional Research Institute (RRI) at West Virginia University. Her research is focused on examining issues related to regional economic development and the differences in the impact of policies across regions. Her current and past research has examined questions related to energy, environmental quality, entrepreneurship, health, and regional growth.
Heather M. Stephens is an Associate Professor in Resource Economics and Management and a Faculty Research Affiliate at the Regional Research Institute (RRI) at  West Virginia University. Her research is focused on examining issues related to regional economic development and the differences in the impact of policies across regions. Her current and past research has examined questions related to energy, environmental quality, entrepreneurship, health, and regional growth. Her prior work has been published in journals that include the American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Environmental and Resource Economics, Growth and Change, Journal of Regional Science, Resource and Energy Economics, and Small Business Economics. She received her Ph.D. and an M.B.A. from The Ohio State University and has a B.A. in Economics and Public Policy Studies from Duke University. Previously, Dr. Stephens was an Assistant Professor of Economics and the Director of Economic Research at California State University, Long Beach, and also has prior experience working for a U.S. Congressman, on strategic partnership development for a Fortune 100 company, as a local economic development director, and on regional economic development and energy-related issues at a university- based applied research institute.
Monica Unseld

Monica Unseld

Monica E. Unseld, Ph.D, MPH received her doctorate in biology from the University of Louisville in 2008 and her Master’s in public health from Benedictine University in 2018. She has over a decade of experience working in the environmental justice space. She believes that data can be a powerful tool for justice and recently founded the group Data for Justice. She lives and works in Louisville, KY.
Monica E. Unseld, Ph.D, MPH received her doctorate in biology from the University of Louisville in 2008 and her Master’s in public health from Benedictine University in 2018. She has over a decade of experience working in the environmental justice space. She believes that data can be a powerful tool for justice and recently founded the group Data for Justice. She lives and works in Louisville, KY.
Jamie Van Nostrand

Jamie Van Nostrand

Professor James M. (Jamie) Van Nostrand joined the faculty of the West Virginia University College of Law in July of 2011 to serve as the Director of the Center for Energy and Sustainable Development. Professor Van Nostrand came to the WVU College of Law from the Pace Law School in White Plains, NY, where he served as Executive Director of the Pace Energy and Climate Center.
Professor James M. (Jamie) Van Nostrand joined the faculty of the West Virginia University College of Law in July of 2011 to serve as the Director of the Center for Energy and Sustainable Development. Professor Van Nostrand came to the WVU College of Law from the Pace Law School in White Plains, NY, where he served as Executive Director of the Pace Energy and Climate Center.

Prior to the spring of 2008, Professor Van Nostrand had a successful career as a partner in the Environmental and Natural Resources practice group of a large law firm based in the Pacific Northwest. In his 22-year career in private practice, Professor Van Nostrand represented energy clients in state regulatory proceedings in eight western states, as well as proceedings before the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. Professor Van Nostrand was recognized by the Energy Bar Association as the 2007 State Regulatory Practitioner of the Year.

Before going into private practice, Professor Van Nostrand spent five years with the New York Public Service Commission as an Assistant to the Commission for Opinions and Review and as Assistant to the Chairman. Professor Van Nostrand has taught courses in energy and regulated industries, environmental law, emissions trading, administrative law and business associations in various capacities at Lewis & Clark Law School, the University of Tennessee College of Law, the University of Iowa College of Law, and Pace Law School. He has published and lectured widely on emissions trading and strategies for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, climate change, energy policy, renewable energy, utility rates and electric restructuring plans, environmental justice, and utility mergers and acquisitions. In his role as Director of the Center for Energy and Sustainable Development, Professor Van Nostrand is involved in various energy and environmental efforts in West Virginia and the Appalachian region, offering objective, unbiased research and policy analyses and promoting policies that strike a proper balance between the development of energy resources and protection of the environment.

Amanda Weinstein

Amanda Weinstein

Dr. Amanda Weinstein is an Associate Professor in the Department of Economics at the University of Akron. She graduated with a PhD in Agricultural, Environmental, and Development Economics from The Ohio State University. As the C. William Swank Program in Rural-Urban Policy Graduate Research Associate, she conducted research on regional economic growth and policy issues including conducting one of the first studies to examine the economic impact of shale development on drilling communities.
Dr. Amanda Weinstein is an Associate Professor in the Department of Economics at the University of Akron. She graduated with a PhD in Agricultural, Environmental, and Development Economics from The Ohio State University. As the C. William Swank Program in Rural-Urban Policy Graduate Research Associate, she conducted research on regional economic growth and policy issues including conducting one of the first studies to examine the economic impact of shale development on drilling communities. She has consulted for various organizations including the OECD, advising on the economic impacts of alternative energy development on rural communities, and the Ohio Consumers’ Counsel, advising on the economic impact of energy policy in Ohio. Her current research areas include examining the impact of specific workforce skills on the resilience of economies and the impact of women in the workforce on economic growth and other economic trends related to quality of life and local amenities. Her research has been featured in various media including the Atlantic’s CityLab and the Harvard Business Review. She recently received grant funding through the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Institute for Advanced Learning & Research, “Charting a More Prosperous Future for America’s Micropolitan Regions” to develop a data-driven approach to economic development policy for small towns. Before starting her PhD at OSU, she was a commissioned officer in the United States Air Force after graduating from the United States Air Force Academy.
Jaimie Worker

Jaimie Worker

Jaimie K. Worker is the senior state policy coordinator for the Economic Analysis and Research Network (EARN) at EPI. She is committed to ensuring that racial and gender equity is a public policy priority and that the leaders of communities impacted by structural racism and oppression are key collaborators in developing public policy.

Jaimie K. Worker is the senior state policy coordinator for the Economic Analysis and Research Network (EARN) at EPI. She is committed to ensuring that racial and gender equity is a public policy priority and that the leaders of communities impacted by structural racism and oppression are key collaborators in developing public policy.

Prior to joining EPI, Worker was a senior policy analyst at Community Change, where for more than six years she worked on racial and economic justice campaigns focused on jobs and public investment in partnership with grassroots organizations. Previously, she worked with the New Organizing Institute, as well as the Restaurant Opportunities Center of Michigan, supporting workplace organizing and policy campaigns to win improved working conditions in the restaurant industry.

Worker is the proud daughter of immigrants and hails from Detroit, Michigan.

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